Space exploration timeline [1950th]

Successful missions (completed or partially completed):
 Information
Completed mission means mission all objectives of which were achieved.
Partially completed mission means mission where at least one objective was achieved.
The list does not include low orbit spacecrafts.

Vanguard 1 – “green color” is orbiting and/or out of battery and/or returned to the Earth

Explorer 1 – “red color” was destroyed

1950th

  • 1957 (4 October) – Sputnik 1 (Soviet Union)
    Achievement: First artificial satellite (circulated Earth for 92 days).
    Conclusion: The satellite was destroyed reentering the Earth’s atmosphere (on 4 January 1958).
  • 1957 (3 November) – Sputnik 2 (Soviet Union)
    Achievement: First biological spacecraft (dog Laika) (circulated Earth for 162 days).
    Conclusion: The satellite was destroyed reentering the Earth’s atmosphere (on 14 April 1958).
  • 1958 (1 February)Explorer 1 (USA)
    Achievement: First US artificial satellite.
    Conclusion: The satellite was destroyed reentering the Earth’s atmosphere (on March 31 1970).
  • 1958 (17 March)Vanguard 1 (USA)
    Achievement: First satellite to be powered by solar cells.
    Conclusion: The satellite remains in the orbit around the Earth.
  • 1959 (2 January)Luna 1 (Soviet Union)
    Achievement:  First spacecraft to fly by the Moon and first spacecraft sent into an orbit around the Sun.
    Conclusion: The satellite remains orbiting around the Sun.
  • 1959 (3 March)Pioneer 4 (USA)
    Achievement:  First US spacecraft fly by the Moon and first to be sent into an orbit around the Sun.
    Conclusion: The satellite remains orbiting around the Sun.
  • 1959 (12 September)Luna 2 (Soviet Union)
    Achievement:  First spacecraft to impact the Moon’s surface.
    Conclusion: The satellite impacted the Moon (on 14 September 1959).
  • 1959 (4 October)Luna 3 (Soviet Union)
    Achievement:  First spacecraft to take a picture of the Moon’s hidden side.
    Conclusion: The satellite remains in an orbit around the Moon.

Picture 1. A heavy-metal home | Photo Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt

 

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Paul Cable
I am a software engineer, amateur astrophysicist and futurist. I like tech and science. My free time I spend taking photos and making videos.

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